Category Archives: Linguistics

“wonderful” would be “two-derful” – Victor Borge’s Inflationary Language

Victor Borge was a Danish and American comedian (and also, interestingly, a conductor and pianist) who was known as the Clown Prince of Denmark. He has a wonderful sketch in which he “inflates” the hidden numbers that exist in words

“wonderful” would be “two-derful” – Victor Borge’s Inflationary Language

Victor Borge was a Danish and American comedian (and also, interestingly, a conductor and pianist) who was known as the Clown Prince of Denmark. He has a wonderful sketch in which he “inflates” the hidden numbers that exist in words

Yiddish proverbs (and some insults)

To continue with the topic of my earlier post about Shakespearean insults, my girlfriend came across this book at a second hand book stall in Berlin: It contains many wonderful proverbs and sayings (all in transliterated Yiddish too!), which range from the

Yiddish proverbs (and some insults)

To continue with the topic of my earlier post about Shakespearean insults, my girlfriend came across this book at a second hand book stall in Berlin: It contains many wonderful proverbs and sayings (all in transliterated Yiddish too!), which range from the

“What does cheese have to do with preserving languages?”

Here’s a very interesting interview from Radio National about Australia’s endangered languages, and more general questions about, among others, preserving languages and the cognitive advantage of bilingualism and multilingualism. From the ABC Radio site: “Three linguists liken saving endangered languages

“What does cheese have to do with preserving languages?”

Here’s a very interesting interview from Radio National about Australia’s endangered languages, and more general questions about, among others, preserving languages and the cognitive advantage of bilingualism and multilingualism. From the ABC Radio site: “Three linguists liken saving endangered languages

Hebrew and the Israeli Arabs

In 1986, Anton Shammas’ Hebrew-language novel Arabesques was published in Israel. When the novel was translated and published in English two years later it was chosen by the editors of The New York Times Book Review as one of the best seven

Hebrew and the Israeli Arabs

In 1986, Anton Shammas’ Hebrew-language novel Arabesques was published in Israel. When the novel was translated and published in English two years later it was chosen by the editors of The New York Times Book Review as one of the best seven